Striding Through

Because a life well lived always finds the right pace

Tag Archives: cycling

2012 in review and the road ahead in 2013

With yesterday’s little 45 minute spin workout on the trainer I put the wraps on an interesting 2012. I ended up with the lowest total run mileage in quite a while with just over 1300 for the year. But I also cycled over 800 miles and swam 22.5 miles. Some of the decrease in run mileage is attributable to a couple of nagging injuries in the early part of 2012, and some of it is due to introducing more intense bike training during the summer when I was training for the 2XRip Duathlon. Nonetheless when it came time to run the Chicago Marathon in the fall, I was ready; if anything I felt like the varied training brought me to the windy city stronger than I had been in a long time.

Lesson to be learned from it? I think so. Clearly varying my training is something that works for me. Biking in particularly keeps my cardiovascular strength at a high-performing level while easing some of the stress on my joints, especially the knees. Even now as I start on a Hansons program in preparation for Boston, I plan to leave a little room for the bike. I am also considering getting back in the pool, if I can fit it into my busy schedule. Cross-training is an essential part of my training, and besides, I haven’t ruled out another duathlon or maybe even an Olympic triathlon someday.

One of the more disappointing aspects of 2012 was the lack of any new PRs. That is, of course, except for the automatic PR earned at my debut duathlon. I thought Chicago for sure would be that kind of a day and I felt fantastic during the race, but at the finish I found myself two seconds shy of the marathon PR I set in 2010 at Boston. Still the fact that I cruised so easily to that result at Chicago leaves me encouraged that with solid, consistent training I can get that time down at Boston in 2013.

I’m now into the fourth week of the Hansons program and feeling pretty good. The first five miles of 2013 are now in the books so I am clearly off and running towards this year’s goals, which include the following:

  • Successfully complete the Hansons plan this spring and stay healthy
  • Boston and a new marathon PR (aggressive goal is 3:10, PR to beat is 3:20:41)
  • Make sure to allow myself proper recovery time after goal races (not always easy)
  • Sub-90 minute half marathon
  • Sub-19 5k race
  • At least one multisport event
  • Marine Corps Marathon? I’m thinking about it
  • Win my club’s summer racing series for my age group (finished 3rd in 2012)

I may add more goals later as the year progresses. Happy New Year to all and let the chase begin! 🙂

Recovery break over, now for the pivot

After my Chicago Marathon experience last week, I returned to Virginia and took some needed time off from running. In fact, the little holiday is still going on as I will rest once more today. Over the past week I’ve been walking, getting a massage and I did a little bit of cycling in the neighborhood.

But I’m feeling the itch to get it going again. So this week I’ll start it back up, albeit slowly. 3 miles tomorrow, 5 or so on Wednesday, 7 on Friday. No speed work. And I will fall back on the bike again to maintain aerobic endurance. I’m hoping to maybe pop out a long easy ride on the road bike Saturday, 30 miles or so.

Time will tell how quickly I return to the prior training intensity. I have the Philadelphia Half Marathon awaiting as my season closing race. It will be my 4th Philly; so far I’ve done the marathon there twice, including last year, and the half there once in 2009 when I set a then-PR and qualified for NYC. I don’t think it will take much to be ready for that one, not with base marathon fitness under my belt. The biggest challenge will be to get accustomed to running a faster tempo for an extended time. So I anticipate several quality workouts to get sharper, and maybe a long run topping out at 15 miles.

After such a big target marathon race, it feels like starting a new season within the season. But if I can manage the next month properly I should be primed for a big Philly result. PR to beat is 1:29:03 and hopefully this time the standard falls!

Riding (and running) through a brand new challenge

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As much as I love my sport of running, there are times when it gets a little monotonous. This is especially true when you run marathons, where the cycle of “train long, race hard, recover, repeat” proceeds unabated through the seasons. I’ve long thought that variety is the key to keeping not only physically but also mentally fit to take on the challenges of long-distance racing; perhaps that’s why I cross-train so much and don’t hit anything close to the mileage numbers that the Pfitzingers and Higdons of the world recommend. It seems that when race day comes I am just as ready as those who follow such plans religiously. That’s not to criticize, just to say my approach is what works for me.

All of which has made me wonder from time to time, what if I actually tried racing in a manner similar to how I train? Until this year it was only a fleeting thought, but back in late February I had an inspiration of sorts, as I walked back to my car after a disappointing performance in a 10 mile race. Underneath my windshield was a postcard advertising an “Olympic Duathlon” for July. I glanced at the card for a few seconds and rendered no decision, other than to think about it some more. But a month later, as the weather warmed up and biking outdoors became more inviting, I noticed the fee was about to go up and that now would be a good time to jump in, if I was up to challenge. Of course, with the question framed in that manner, there was no way I wasn’t going to sign up.

In mid-May, once I had my spring races behind me, it was time to really focus on the duathlon. Whereas cycling before had really just been a means of supporting my running it was now something demanding equal if not greater time and attention. So I quickly went from 40-50 mile running weeks to 15-20 mile running weeks, with anywhere from 40-70 bike miles a week. As the weeks progressed my legs got used to the increased bike burden and to my surprise my running started to really take off as well after slogging through a lackluster spring season. In June I knocked out a 5k in 19:34 for my fastest one of the year so far. Clearly this training plan was working for me. The closer I got to race day, the sharper I could feel myself getting in both disciplines. When race day came I definitely felt ready.

This event was in rural Howard County, Maryland, not far from the scene of that flop of a 10 miler in February. It was only an hour or so away from my Virginia home, but with an early start and my newbie status in multisport racing, I decided to book a hotel room in Columbia the night before. It turned out to be a wise decision as I was able to relax, get a fairly decent night’s sleep and arrive at the site before the traffic with plenty of time to prepare my transition area and warm up. For a fairly big race, it was about the most stressless pre-race scenario I have had.

The format for the race was a 2-mile run, followed by a 26-mile ride, then capped off with a 4-mile run. Both of the runs took place in Western Regional Park over a loop course, while the bike ride did two times around on a 13-mile loop over hilly country roads. We started gathering in the corrals at 6:45 AM and at 7:00, after the anthem, the elites took off. My corral of 45-and-over men was next and off we went at precisely 7:05.

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In preparing my race tactics beforehand it was obvious that the runs would be my strong suit and the ride was an area where I would be severely tested by more seasoned cyclists. So the temptation was strong to really fire off the line and be as close to the front as possible and “bank” some time or position. But in the final days leading up to the race, I reconsidered that idea and decided to conserve some energy in the hope of staying strong for the whole day. I watched others bolt out and down the first hill but largely bided my time at a tempo pace. I came through the 2 miles barely laboring – but still in good age group position. Time: 13:35.67 (#6 in age group). Transition 1 to bike: 2:02.07.

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As I headed out on the bike course I started in a fairly low gear, and spent much of the first mile looking to get into a comfortable cadence while gradually adding more gears. Meanwhile we rocketed down some hills and whipped around some quick turns. Finally in about mile 4 the first big climbs came upon us. For the most part I had been getting passed by a lot of riders and was a bit disappointed by that, but I then noticed that many of them were not as strong on the hills as I was. So this commenced a jockeying of sorts that went on for the rest of this segment: me being passed on the descents or flats, then me catching the same riders on the climbs. The humidity really started to take hold on the second loop and temperature was also on the rise. I think I slowed down a little bit, but as we entered the park again to head back to transition I powered it up the final hill and passed a couple of those riders I had been battling for 26 miles. But I was also pretty hot by now; and I wondered how much I had left for the final run. Time: 1:26:30.77 (#13 in age group). Transition 2 to run: 2:03:53.

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The second run did the same park loop as the first but in the opposite direction and twice. I jogged from the transition area to let my legs adjust back to running then tried to pick it up once I got onto the course. But my legs felt like jelly and it seemed I was barely shuffling along. However I was apparently doing much better than that, or others were suffering far worse than me. For the next four miles I passed one runner after another, including a few who had passed me on the bike and who I thought I would never see again. Throughout this segment I think only 2 runners passed me and they were both younger age-group runners. On the second loop it was not uncommon at all to see walkers but that just made me push harder. Just like in a marathon, I told myself “no stops!” As I got to the top of the final hill I knew I had my first multisport finisher’s medal all but in hand. As I finished I felt tired, soaked with sweat to the bone…and totally awesome. Time: 30:59.09 (#5 in age group). Finish time: 2:15:11.13 (#8 in 45-49 age group).

It was a great day, all told. While I had no formal time goal in mind, I did think 2:15 would be nice result if everything came together. So, I guess it all did come together nicely. 🙂 I’m glad I stepped up to this challenge and am also glad my wife Lynn was there to cheer me on and take some great photos for the blog. I also have put a shout out to the race organizers and volunteers, who were absolutely top-notch. As for the next multisport event, that will have to wait until 2013. Right now I have the Chicago Marathon to prepare for. But there will definitely be another such race, because this one was a blast!

And not to forget these details, which I see on just about every multisport report I have ever read:

Running shoes: Saucony Hattori

Bike: Litespeed Tuscany with Zipp wheels

Bike shoes: Specialized

Bike Helmet/gloves: Bell/Pearl Izumi

Apparel: Pearl Izumi sleeveless triathlon jersey, CW/X running tights, Point6 lightweight socks, Under Armour headband

Other equipment: yellow tinted shades, Timex Ironman 30-split watch

On the Road to New York, Week 1

I’m now into Week 2 of training for the New York City Marathon on November 7. This will enable me to check off another box in my quest to run all five of the World Marathon Majors.

This comes after a summer of not focusing at all on marathon or long distance training; indeed from April 19 when I ran the Boston Marathon, until August 7, I didn’t do a single run longer than 13 miles. I think (or at least I hope) this break was good for me both mentally and physically. As I ramped back up to training last week, I felt eager to get it on, even though the heat and humidity outside was stifling.

All in all it was a good start last week, with 41 miles logged, plus another 20 or so of cycling. During the week I ran one final summer 5k race, and then I capped off the week with a long run of 16 on Saturday.

One of the things I’m trying to do this fall is re-institute my commitment to cycling as my primary form of cross-training (with soccer being my other form). Two years ago, when I was training for the Outer Banks Marathon, I alternated my weekend long runs with weekend long rides. In other words, on one Saturday I would do a long run, the next I would get on the bike and go for a long ride. When OBX rolled around I was in perhaps my best marathon shape ever, and while I didn’t PR on race day, I did run a very solid 3:21:35. I also recovered very quickly from OBX.

The reason I picked up the cycling back then was my recovery from a groin injury in the spring of that year. I couldn’t run for much of the spring and early summer, so once I was at about 70% recovery status, I cycled. Lo and behold, it turned out I really enjoyed it a lot, and I also noticed it helped my fitness. Then when I finally could resume regular training, I decided to keep the cycling as part of it. I find that cycling serves two great purposes for my training — it provides some serious endurance work and it takes some stress off the joints.

In preparation for longer riding this fall, I even went out and got myself  a new (actually used but it’s nice) road bike, and have already put down one ride of 35 miles on it, plus a bunch of shorter rides.

All of this leads to the current week:

Done so far –

  • Monday 5k easy jog at recovery pace
  • Tuesday 7.6 mile progression run, finishing at marathon pace
  • Wednesday track intervals 8×500 at 5k race pace
  • Thursday 5 miles easy recovery pace, 45 minute core session

Planned for the rest of the week –

  • Friday 8-10 with some tempo
  • Saturday 35-40 miles road cycling
  • Sunday soccer with my coed adult team

That will leave me with fewer miles this week, somewhere around 31, but I’ll get a big ride in and that will set me up for next week. Next week the running mileage will approach 45, including a weekend long run of 18. I envision this type of trend persisting throughout the fall until taper time kicks in around mid-October. I’m nowhere near marathon fitness right now, but I’m confident that by November 7, I will be as ready as I’ve ever been.